God’s Search and Rescue Plan Involves You

search and rescue

When children go missing, parents go looking. And that’s what God has done. There’s not a square foot on earth that doesn’t have his footprints. He began searching for them the moment Adam and Eve made a choice and lost their way. He sent the nation of Israel looking. He sent his Son to “seek and save what was lost” (Luke 19:10).

Today he sends his church. In Acts 1:8 we find his search and rescue plan: “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.”

Jesus sent the disciples into the middle of Jerusalem and told them to wait. While they were waiting a crowd gathered for Pentecost. Some estimate Jerusalem swelled to over one million people during this time. The Holy Spirit came on them, Peter preached, and the church swelled from 120 to over three thousand.

It didn’t stop there. They devoted themselves to “the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer” (Acts 2:42). That first church in Jerusalem grounded its people in the Word, in deep community, to sharing meals and sharing Christ, and to prayer. They had to. The task at hand was too big for them to accomplish on their own. They needed each other. Mostly they needed God.

That hasn’t changed, has it? We still have the same commission to be witnesses for Jesus in our Jerusalems and in our world. We are still called to the Word, to love each other, to share life, and to prayer. And we are still searching for those who have lost their way.

We are still searching because the Father still has children who are missing. So go to your Jerusalem and wait. God will bring you power as you serve him there. Let’s not leave a square foot without our footprints.

Finding the Door to an Eternity of Sundays

doors

In the spring of 2010 archaeologists unearthed a 3,500-year-old door to the afterlife from the tomb of a high-ranking Egyptian official near Karnak temple in Luxor.[1] This door was meant to take the official from death to the afterworld.

Jack found another door to the afterlife. He taught English literature at Oxford and spent many evenings walking the gardens of Magdalene College. And it was one evening while walking with his friend John that Jack discovered his way.

His door seems to have found a way into his writings as a wardrobe through which his characters could enter Narnia, a kind of medieval version of Paradise. Jack, or C.S. Lewis as we know him today, went on to become one of the great apologists for the Christian faith in the 20th century. He wrote of death in this way: “If we really think that home is elsewhere and that this life is a ‘wandering to find home,’ why should we not look forward to the arrival?[2]

How would you write about that time you take your last breath and the moment right after?  Will you look forward to it? Or will it be a terrifying moment for you? And would you want to be able to face your death unafraid?

Jesus enables us to do that, you know. He moves us from a Friday and Saturday of death and disillusionment to a Sunday of victory. Your way into that victory is through a door. Jesus Christ.

Jesus said of himself, “I am the door; whoever enters through me will be saved. He will come in and go out, and find pasture” (John 10:9). And all of the Easter stories tell this.

In another garden, another Magdalene—Mary—was looking for Jesus’ dead body to anoint, but it was missing from the tomb (John 20). Two angels speak to her but she is so upset she misses them. She keeps talking about her “Lord” and that he had been taken away. It took Jesus coming to her and calling her by name before she recognized what had happened.

You’ll have your Fridays and Saturdays. Days that are dark and days that are lost. In those days when you can’t find the door out, do as Mary did. Keep calling Jesus “Lord.”  Keep calling and keep looking for him.

Because if you keep calling him Lord, he’ll call you by name. And when he does, you will turn and find the door to an eternity of Sundays.

[1] Door to afterlife from ancient Egyptian tomb found http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100329/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt_antiquities

[2] http://en.proverbia.net/citasautor.asp?autor=14386

The Greatest Question of All Time

A BBC magazine answered the “101 greatest questions of all time.”[1] What did they include? Well, questions like “What is OK short for?” Answer? “OK comes from ‘oll korrect’, a deliberately misspelled writing of ‘all correct.’ It was popularized in Boston newspapers around the 1840s when it was fashionable to go around spelling things incorrectly for humorous effect.”

The #1 “greatest question” was “Where is the safest place to stand outside in a thunderstorm?” And, in case you must know the answer, it is “A car or other enclosed metal structure is the safest place to be in a thunderstorm.”

Jesus asked a question that should have been first on the list. He and the disciples were in Caesarea Philippi. Call it the shopping mall of religion. It was located in a region known as Paneon, or the home of the Greek god Pan. Once it had been a center of Baal worship. A temple was located there dedicated to the godhead of Caesar. And other temples of Syrian gods dotted the landscape.

Plenty of gods to choose from in Caesarea Philippi. So Jesus asks his disciples this question: “Who do you say I am?” (Mark 8:29). Oh, at first he asked them what others were saying about him. The answers came back in rapid fire: “Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.”

But Jesus was more concerned with their answer to his question, so he asked, “Who do you say I am?” They all looked at this homeless carpenter and thought about that question. We don’t know how long they thought before Peter replied, “You are the Christ.”

[1] “Greatest 101 questions of all time: 1-20” found at  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/

4696372/Greatest-101-questions-of-all-time-1-20.html

When Jesus Comes Knocking

The knock came at the door of the inn. It was late. We can imagine the innkeeper had been burning both ends of the candle. The census crowd had packed Bethlehem and he had finally locked the doors for the night.

Until the knock. He shuffled his feet through the dark and made his way to the door. Opening it with the slightest of cracks he peered out to see a young couple. Looking more closely he saw a young woman who was about to give birth to a child.

Rooms were full. It was late. And they didn’t look very special. He had to decide whether he would find room for them or not.

And you will too. John’s rendition of the birth of Christ comes in a few short words: “The Word  [logos] became flesh and made his dwelling among us” (John 1:14). Greek hearers understood the word “logos” as the representation of God. The essence of God was found in his Word.

Hebrew readers perked up to John’s message too. John writes: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning.” He book ends the first sentence of his book with the phrase “in the beginning.”  They knew it as the words that began the first book of the Torah, or Genesis.

John writes about beginnings. John writes about God’s very representation dwelling among us. And he writes to tell us that we have the same decision to make as the innkeeper. Will we find a place for Jesus in our lives or will we send him away?

Some send him away because he looks too plain. Nothing special about him. Don’t make that mistake. He comes to common places like your home and common places like your heart.

Some send him away because life is crowded. Many demands and many deadlines. And you’re not sure if you have room for him. But he only comes to give you what he has already done. He desires to give you forgiveness.

And some send him away because they think it’s too late. They’ve already done too much that can’t be forgiven. They’ve already gone too far away.

But it’s never too late. Not with the one who comes and makes his dwelling among us. You need only to open the door.

Join us Sunday as we continue The Story at 10:30 am.

I Can Make a Difference part 3: Do You Have an Hour to Spare?

Okay everyone, one more time. Say it with me, “I can make a difference”.

Do you believe that? Do you truly believe that you can make a difference? What do you have to do in order to make a difference in this world that God has placed you in? Today I want to look at the thought, “Do you have an hour to spare?”

In Matthew we read a very familiar passage of scripture. It is one that we read all the time during Easter. It is the story where Jesus is praying at the garden of Gethsemane.

Let’s look at Matthew 26:36-46.

36. Then Jesus came with them to a place called Gethsemane, and said to the disciples, “Sit here while I go and pray over there.”

37. And He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and He began to be sorrowful and deeply distressed.

38. Then He said to them, “My soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to death. Stay here and watch with Me.”

39. He went a little farther and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, “O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will.”

40. Then He came to the disciples and found them sleeping, and said to Peter, “What! Could you not watch with Me one hour?

41. Watch and pray, lest you enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

42. Again, a second time, He went away and prayed, saying, “O My Father, if this cup cannot pass away from Me unless I drink it, Your will be done.”

43. And He came and found them asleep again, for their eyes were heavy.

44. So He left them, went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words.

45. Then He came to His disciples and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and resting? Behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of Man is being betrayed into the hands of sinners.

46. Rise, let us be going. See, My betrayer is at hand.”

Look closer at verse 40. It says, “Then He came to the disciples and found them sleeping, and said to Peter, ‘What! Could you not watch with Me one hour?’”

Do you notice how he singles Peter out? Why Peter? I believe it was because He was closer to Peter and He saw great potential in Peter as the leader of the bunch over anyone else.

And He asks Peter that question, “Could you not watch with Me one hour?”

I can see Him looking at Peter and maybe He has tears in His eyes, maybe there was just a look, but it was as He was telling Peter, “One hour, that’s all I’m asking you for is one hour.”

Maybe Jesus has come to you today and He is asking you, “Do you have an hour to spare?” The disciples couldn’t make it an hour at that moment. And knowing now what Jesus was about to go through I’m thinking surely you could give Him one hour. But the disciples didn’t know what He was about to go through. They didn’t know until it happened.

But we know. We have the Bible to tell us what Jesus went through. We have the Bible to tell us about the trial that He was falsely accused of. We have the Bible to tell us about the beating that He endured. We have the Bible to tell us about the nails that weren’t driven in His hands and feet. We have the Bible to tell us about His last words on the cross as He hung there and said it is finished. And we have the Bible to tell us about the resurrection. So surely after we know all that we know we can make the decision to spare an hour for Him.

After all, look at what He has done for us.

Here’s the challenge. I challenge you to commit one hour of worship, one hour of personal devotion, and one hour of service each week.

The hour of worship will be easy if you attend church each week, but if for some reason you miss church one week, just make it up at home by listening to worship music and find you a good preacher on TV or podcast. Most weeks the one of hour of service could be easy depending on what you do in the church to serve. But serving doesn’t have to just be in the church, it could be volunteering somewhere else. And the devotion time will be something that you may have to work on. Some of you no problem you are already doing this. But think about it this way, if you took Monday through Saturday and spent just 10 minutes a day on reading your Bible and praying you would accomplish one hour in a week.

Think about how much time we give to other things in our life. How many hours a week do you watch TV? How many hours a week do you play on the computer? How many hours a week do you spend on your relationships? How many hours do you spend doing housework? Sure, none of these things are bad things, but we spend time on them because we want to do them.

Jesus said to His disciples, “Could you not give me just one hour?” Just one. And I believe that He is asking that of you today. Do you have an hour to spare?

I want to close with an article written by a man named Monte Unger. It was written in a publication called NAVLOG in January of 1975. This is what it says.

How often have you talked with someone on the telephone who seemed to be in a hurry and wanted to get on with more important business? Or visited with someone on the street and received that same hurried feeling? You’ve undoubtedly experienced it…and didn’t enjoy it. And, perhaps, you have also been guilty of this. If you have, why not decide to tithe time, save up chunks, bits and pieces of it, and give them away to people who interrupt your pre-established plans?

It is a great principle of love that people don’t interrupt, not really. Perhaps there shouldn’t even be such a word as interrupt; for when people come into your existence, even for a brief time, that is a wonderful moment of experience for both of you. Relish it. Probe it. Invest some of the time you have tithed. We can’t afford to indulge in the luxury of “being too busy and important” for another person.

We have time for such inanimate things as pieces of mail, vast sprawling shopping centers, the television program which starts at 7:30. But what about relationships with people? Isn’t that a great deal of what life is all about–loving other people? Remember Jesus? How he raced about, hurrying from one city to another, collecting great crowds on the way to give them a few minutes of hurried heaven-data, then dashing on to the next place?

No, that is not the picture of Jesus the New Testament gives. He had time for people. In a crowd, a woman touched his robe. Lots of people were probably pushing against him, touching his robe, but he discerned the urgency in this particular touch. He stopped, taking valuable time for this “interruption.” His disciples were full of fire and computer-like- efficiency. They wanted to get on with the task of getting something done, even if they didn’t always know what that “something” was.

Once a bunch of small, grimy-fingered kids came along and wanted to climb on the Master’s lap. “Get those kids out of here,” thought the goal-oriented disciples.

“No, let them stay. Let’s enjoy them and let them enjoy us,” thought the true-goal-oriented Man from heaven who knew and expressed the great worth of the individual.

The next time a person “interrupts” you, think not of your work and your deadlines; rather, think of that person’s needs, of his covert compliment in desiring to spend a few moments with you. Your meeting may be a significant point in each of your lives, because it is an encounter with another person God has created. you may impart something crucial to his fulfillment–or he to yours.

Paul prayed: “May God, who gives patience, steadiness, and encouragement, help you to live in complete harmony with each other–each with the attitude of Christ toward the other” (Rom. 15:5, TLB). Are you caught up on your time-tithe?

Again my question to you today is do you have an hour to spare?

I Can Make a Difference Part 1: What a Difference a Day Can Make

Sunday, I began a new series called I Can Make a Difference. Right now, where you are at in front of God and everybody I want you to say at the top of your lungs, “I can make a difference.” Come on I’ll say it with you. Let’s say “I Can Make a Difference.” Here we go.

“I Can Make a Difference!”

Don’t that feel good to get it off your chest.

Do you really believe that? Do you really believe that you can make a difference? If we really believe that we can make a difference then what are you doing with your life to make a difference?

I want to look at the thought “What a Difference a Day can Make.”

Every day you get the chance to make a difference in someone else’s life. Every day you get the chance to make a difference in your own life. You have to make the choice; you have to choose to make a difference.

In Colossians 4:2-6 Paul gives us some sound advice in making a difference. Let’s turn in our Bibles to Colossians 4:2-6.

  1. Continue earnestly in prayer, being vigilant in it with thanksgiving;
  2. meanwhile praying also for us, that God would open to us a door for the word, to speak the mystery of Christ, for which I am also in chains,
  3. that I may make it manifest, as I ought to speak.
  4. Walk in wisdom toward those who are outside, redeeming the time.
  5. Let your speech always be with grace, seasoned with salt, that you may know how you ought to answer each one.

I like how the Message paraphrases this passage. Let’s look at it together.

2-4) Pray diligently. Stay alert, with your eyes wide open in gratitude. Don’t forget to pray for us, that God will open doors for telling the mystery of Christ, even while I’m locked up in this jail. Pray that every time I open my mouth I’ll be able to make Christ plain as day to them.

5-6) Use your heads as you live and work among outsiders. Don’t miss a trick. Make the most of every opportunity. Be gracious in your speech. The goal is to bring out the best in others in a conversation, not put them down, not cut them out.

Paul is in prison and he is asking the people to pray that he gets an opportunity to share Christ. Notice he’s not asking them to praying that he gets out, he’s not asking them to pray that he would be found innocent, but he is asking them to pray that he gets an opportunity to share Christ.

Paul also gives the outsiders, as he calls them, good advice. He says, “make the most of every opportunity.” He also says, “the goal is to bring out the best in others in a conversation, not put them down, not cut them out.”

Are we, as Christians, making the most of every day for the one that saved us? Every day belongs to God. What are we going to do in a day that will change the world?

I jotted down what a few people in the Bible and what they did in a day.

Look at what Jesus did in a day. He fed the five thousand. He turned water into wine at the wedding feast at Cana. He healed the sick, made blind eyes see, and raised the dead; remember the story of Lazarus. He also walked on water.

Moses parted the Red Sea. He met with God and received the Ten Commandments. How about Joshua? He saw the walls of Jericho fall. Sure he marched around them for six days before that but he was being obedient to what God was telling him to do. David killed the giant in one day. He went from shepherd boy to king in one day.

If they accomplished all these things in a day, what can you do to make a difference in a day? Here are three things that I believe anybody can do to make a difference in a day. I believe that if you will do these things then you can bring change to this world.

  1. Reach Someone for Christ.

I believe that you can use every day to reach someone for Christ.

What are you doing to share your faith? You don’t always have to talk in order to share your faith. Sometimes you just have to love someone.

Jesus saved you from your sins. He pulled you out of the destruction that you were in and planted your feet on a firm foundation. Because of what He did for us we can share it everyone.

I love how Paul puts his Christian life in perspective. Philippians 1:21-24 says, “21) For to me, to live is Christ, and to die is gain. 22) But if I live on in the flesh, this will mean fruit from my labor; yet what I shall choose I cannot tell. 23) For I am hard-pressed between the two, having a desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. 24) Nevertheless to remain in the flesh is more needful for you.”

Here Paul is battling between staying on earth and going to Heaven. He knows that going to Heaven is far better than staying but he so wants to stay on earth and tell more people about Jesus.

Do you struggle with this? Do you get to the point in your Christian walk that you love God so much that you don’t want to meet Him because you want to tell others about Him? We are to share our faith not out of obligation to Christ, but because we want others to experience the same fulfillment in Christ that we have felt.

Maybe you’re a skeptic here today. Maybe you think how is telling someone else about Jesus going to help me make a difference? It’s actually quite simple. When you tell someone about Jesus and the relationship that you have with Jesus you are bringing hope.

People in this world are looking for hope and we can help because we have the answer to hope and if you share that answer you are making a difference.

  1. A Chance to Serve

You can make a difference by using every day as a chance to serve.

1 Peter 4:10 says, “As each one has received a gift, minister it to one another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.”

Galatians 5:13 says, “For you, brethren, have been called to liberty; only do not use liberty as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another.”

We know that Jesus was a good servant. Here the Son of God came from heaven and humbled himself and walked amongst us as someone that was here to serve the people.

He tells us something about Himself in John 13:13-15. “13) You call Me Teacher and Lord, and you say well, for so I am. 14) If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. 15) For I have given you an example that you should do as I have done to you.”

Jesus lived an example of a servant here on earth. He shows us how to serve. We live in a selfish world. People are consumed with themselves and their needs. We can look at people and see how their lives end up and we can know what happened. When people end up in bad situations it is the result of them or someone close to them that wanted their own selfish desires and it was because of that selfish desire that led to said person’s downfall.

A drug addict’s life or their family’s life is affected by their drug problem. An alcoholic’s life or their family’s life is affected by their alcohol problem. A porn addict’s life or their family’s life is affect by their pornography problem. A gambling addict’s life or their family’s life is affected by their gambling problem. When you allow those selfish desires to consume your life it is not only affecting your life, but it is affecting the life of those around you.

Jesus talked about serving others and Luke shared a statement that Paul said in Acts 20:35 when Jesus is quoted as saying, “it is more blessed to give than to receive.”

This statement brings me to my next point…

  1. A Chance to Give

You can use every day as a chance to give.

Robert Morris wrote a fantastic book on giving called The Blessed Life. You should read this book. He makes it very clear on how and why you should give according to God’s word.

I believe that none of us would argue the fact that we should all give money but you should also give of your time and you should give of your talents. It is important that we take on the mindset of giving. God’s desire is for us to become a group of giving people.

The first step to giving is submitting to God. James 4:7 says, “Therefore submit to God…” But it doesn’t end there the rest of that verse is “… Resist the devil and he will flee from you.”

When we learn to submit to God we are in turn giving our self to God and telling God that we no longer want our wants and dreams but we want His wants and dreams for our life.

Proverbs 3:5, 6 says, “5) Trust in the Lord with all your heart, And lean not on your own understanding; 6) In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He shall direct your paths.”

When we learn to give of ourselves and submit to God and put all our trust in Him, think about the difference we can make. We are no longer thinking the way our flesh thinks but we are now thinking the way God wants us to think.

Luke gives us great insight into giving. Let’s look at Luke 6:37-38. It says, “37) “Judge not, and you shall not be judged. Condemn not, and you shall not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. 38) Give, and it will be given to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, and running over will be put into your bosom. For with the same measure that you use, it will be measured back to you.”

All these things: not judging, not condemning, forgiving, and giving; if we do these then they will be given back to us.

The more we give of ourselves then the more God will give us. The more we give of money, the more God will give back to us. The more we give of our time, the more God will give back to us. The more we give of our talents, the more God will give back to us.

Can God trust us with what He has given us?

My thought for you today was What a difference a day can make. How will you spend today making a difference for the kingdom of God?

Think about this for a moment…

U.S. News and World Report did a survey of 6000 people in 1988 on time and this is the results of the survey. I am sure that some of this has changed but think about this.

In a lifetime the average American will spend: six months sitting at stoplights, eight months opening junk mail, one year looking for misplaced objects, two years unsuccessfully returning phone calls, four years doing housework, five years waiting in line, and six years eating.

What could we be doing during those times to make a difference? What difference can we make in a day? It is time that we stop wasting our days and start using them for God.

Carl Sandburg said, “Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.”

As I close let me encourage you with this thought, Every day, Everywhere. The idea is to utilize a powerful concept that inspires you to see every day as an important ingredient in reaching people for Christ. Each day look for opportunities to serve others in their jobs, schools, home and work.

Every day Jesus made a difference in someone’s life and it is time that we slow and think of how we can make a difference in someone’s life in one day.

Psalm 23 Part 1

Out of all the Psalms in the Bible, Psalm 23 is probably the most popular of all Psalms. You see it everywhere. One of the most popular places that you will find Psalm 23 is somewhere on the funeral program. This Psalm is used in most funeral eulogies. Songs have been written about this Psalm. And many people can quote this Psalm.

Let’s take a look it.

Psalm 23:1-6

  1. The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
  2. He makes me to lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside the still waters.
  3. He restores my soul; He leads me in the paths of righteousness For His name’s sake.
  4. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; For You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me.
  5. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; You anoint my head with oil; My cup runs over.
  6. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me All the days of my life; And I will dwell in the house of the Lord Forever.

Lets look at verse one. It says, “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.”

In order for us to understand the fact that the Lord is our shepherd, we must first understand what a shepherd is. If anyone knew anything about being a shepherd it was David. David was a shepherd from a very young age. We know that when he was chosen king, he was attending his father’s sheep. (1 Samuel 16:11)

During the time that this verse was written, shepherds were of great importance. There was an abundance of sheep in this region. The people were shepherds before they were farmers. The role of the shepherd consisted of many jobs.

The shepherd was to care for the sick and wounded sheep. When they crossed the water the shepherd made sure that they would cross safely. The shepherd would find the sheep that strayed from the fold. The shepherd would find food for the flock. The shepherd even knew each and every one of his sheep; he would even give a pet name to some of them.

In John 10:11, Jesus calls Himself the good shepherd. He says, “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd gives His life for the sheep.”

We are the sheep and Jesus is the good shepherd. Understanding the fact that Jesus is the good shepherd and we are the sheep, then we know that Jesus is our provider, guider, our protector and healer. He is our keeper and shearer. He is our nurturer and defender.

“There is an old story of two men hiking in Wales. They came across a boy in the mountains keeping his sheep. The travelers talked with him about shepherding, and the conversation went to Psalm 23. One of the men told the boy, “Think of the five fingers of your left hand. Let each word stand for one finger. You can meditate on Psalm 23:1 by grasping each finger, one at a time, with your right hand.” They showed him how to do it. The man grabbed his thumb and said, “That stands for ‘The.’” The index finger was ‘Lord,’ and they talked about who the Lord was. The middle finger stood for ‘is’ – present tense, right now. The fourth finger was ‘my.’ And the little finger stood for ‘shepherd.’

The following year the men returned on another hiking trip, and this time they stopped at a small wayfaring house for a cup of tea. On the table was a picture of the very boy they had met a year before.

‘Yes,’ said the woman, ‘that was my son. He died last winter in a storm. He fell down a cliff and lay there a long time. Only later did we find him.’

Then she said, ‘There was something strange about it, though, which we’ve never understood. When we found his body, his right hand was grasping the fourth finger of his left hand.’

‘Yes,’ said the men, ‘we can explain that.’ And they told the mother what had happened the previous year. The boy, in griping his finger, was simply reminding himself, ‘The Lord is MY shepherd.’

When we realize that the Lord is my shepherd, we can understand that He is always taking care of us.

Jesus knows our wants and desires and He wants the best for us.

The rest of verse one says, I shall not want. The message translates it as, “I don’t need a thing.” You see with Jesus as your shepherd, you will not need anything.

Our wants, our appetites and thirsts for happiness, plenty, health, fulfilling relationships and things. Only the good shepherd can meet our deepest needs.

The unfortunate thing is we try to fill our life with stuff that don’t matter in this life. Some people feel empty inside and they look to everything to try to fill that emptiness. They look to a career. They think that if they just work harder, climb the corporate ladder, be the best in their company or make lots of money that it will fill the void. Matthew 16:26 says, “For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul?”

Some people try to fill the void with relationships. They think if I can just make lots of friends or they go from relationship to relationship they believe they can fill that void. 2 Corinthians 6:14 says, “Do not be yoked together with unbelievers. For what do righteousness and wickedness have in common? Or what fellowship can light have with darkness?”

Some people try to fill the void with substances. They take a drink wanting to take the pain away or they shoot up wanting to forget about everything. They hope that these things fill the void. Galatians 5:19-21 says, “19) Now the works of the flesh are evident, which are: adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lewdness, 20) idolatry, sorcery, hatred, contentions, jealousies, outbursts of wrath, selfish ambitions, dissensions, heresies, 21) envy, murders, drunkenness, revelries, and the like; of which I tell you beforehand, just as I also told you in time past, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.”

We try to fill our life with stuff. Stuff cannot fulfill what only Jesus can fulfill. With Jesus there is no void, there is no wants. I am fulfilled in Christ. Only Christ can fulfill any void that you may have. You cannot fulfill the void with status, or money, or relationships, or drugs and alcohol.

Psalm 23:1 says, “The Lord is MY shepherd. I shall not want.”